Commit 95f6cf33 authored by Gabriel Mazetto's avatar Gabriel Mazetto Committed by Achilleas Pipinellis
Browse files

Improved documentation on HA sentinel part and Redis replication troubleshooting.

parent cc9ec8288fe2
......@@ -8,6 +8,27 @@ that comes bundled with GitLab Omnibus packages.
information. We recommend using a combination of a Redis password and tight
firewall rules to secure your Redis service.
<!-- START doctoc generated TOC please keep comment here to allow auto update -->
<!-- DON'T EDIT THIS SECTION, INSTEAD RE-RUN doctoc TO UPDATE -->
**Table of Contents**
- [Configure your own Redis server](#configure-your-own-redis-server)
- [Configure Redis using Omnibus](#configure-redis-using-omnibus)
- [Experimental Redis Sentinel support](#experimental-redis-sentinel-support)
- [Redis setup](#redis-setup)
- [Source install](#source-install)
- [Omnibus Install](#omnibus-install)
- [Troubleshooting Replication](#troubleshooting-replication)
- [Sentinel](#sentinel)
- [Sentinel setup (Community Edition)](#sentinel-setup-community-edition)
- [Sentinel setup (EE Only)](#sentinel-setup-ee-only)
- [GitLab setup](#gitlab-setup)
- [Sentinel troubleshooting](#sentinel-troubleshooting)
- [Omnibus install](#omnibus-install)
- [Source install](#source-install-1)
<!-- END doctoc generated TOC please keep comment here to allow auto update -->
## Configure your own Redis server
If you're hosting GitLab on a cloud provider, you can optionally use a
......@@ -37,6 +58,7 @@ Redis.
unicorn['enable'] = false
sidekiq['enable'] = false
postgresql['enable'] = false
gitlab_rails['enable'] = false
gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
mailroom['enable'] = false
......@@ -59,120 +81,294 @@ Redis.
## Experimental Redis Sentinel support
> [Introduced][ce-1877] in GitLab 8.11.
> [Introduced][ce-1877] in GitLab 8.11, improved in 8.13.
Since GitLab 8.11, you can configure a list of Redis Sentinel servers that
will monitor a group of Redis servers to provide you with a standard failover
support.
There is currently one exception to the Sentinel support: `mail_room`, the
component that processes incoming emails. It doesn't support Sentinel yet, but
we hope to integrate a future release that does support it.
To get a better understanding on how to correctly setup Sentinel, please read
the [Redis Sentinel documentation](http://redis.io/topics/sentinel) first, as
failing to configure it correctly can lead to data loss.
Redis Sentinel can handle the most important tasks in a HA environment to help
keep servers online with minimal to no downtime:
- Monitors master and slave instances to see if they are available
- Promote a slave to master when the master fails.
- Demote a master to slave when failed master comes back online (to prevent
data-partitioning).
- Can be queried by clients to always connect to the correct master server.
There is currently one exception to the Sentinel support: `mail_room`, the
component that processes incoming emails. It doesn't support Sentinel yet, but
we hope to integrate a future release that does support it soon.
The configuration consists of three parts:
- Redis setup
- Sentinel setup
- GitLab setup
- Setup Redis Master and Slave nodes
- Setup Sentinel nodes
- Setup GitLab
> **IMPORTANT**: You need at least 3 independent machines: physical, or VMs
running into distinct physical machines. If you fail to provision the
machines in that specific way, any issue with the shared environment can
bring your entire setup down.
Read carefully how to configure those components below.
### Redis setup
You must have at least 2 Redis servers: 1 Master, 1 or more Slaves.
You must have at least `3` Redis servers: `1` Master, `2` Slaves, and they need to
be each in a independent machine (see explanation above).
They should be configured the same way and with similar server specs, as
in a failover situation, any Slave can be elected as the new Master by
in a failover situation, any `Slave` can be elected as the new `Master` by
the Sentinel servers.
In a minimal setup, the only required change for the slaves in `redis.conf`
is the addition of a `slaveof` line pointing to the initial master.
You can increase the security by defining a `requirepass` configuration in
the master, and `masterauth` in slaves.
With Sentinel, you must define a password to protect the access as both
Sentinel instances and other redis instances should be able to talk to
each other over the network.
---
You'll need to define both `requirepass` and `masterauth` in all
nodes because they can be re-configured at any time by the Sentinels
during a failover, and change it's status as `Master` or `Slave`.
**Configuring your own Redis server**
Initial `Slave` nodes will have in `redis.conf` an additional `slaveof` line
pointing to the initial `Master`.
1. Add to the slaves' `redis.conf`:
#### Source install
```conf
# IP and port of the master Redis server
slaveof 10.10.10.10 6379
```
**Master Redis instance**
1. Optionally, set up password authentication for increased security.
Add the following to master's `redis.conf`:
You need to make the following changes in `redis.conf`:
```conf
# Optional password authentication for increased security
requirepass "<password>"
```
1. Define a `bind` address pointing to a local IP that your other machines
can reach you. If you really need to bind to an external acessible IP, make
sure you add extra firewall rules to prevent unauthorized access:
1. Then add this line to all the slave servers' `redis.conf`:
```conf
# By default, if no "bind" configuration directive is specified, Redis listens
# for connections from all the network interfaces available on the server.
# It is possible to listen to just one or multiple selected interfaces using
# the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or more IP addresses.
#
# Examples:
#
# bind 192.168.1.100 10.0.0.1
# bind 127.0.0.1 ::1
bind 0.0.0.0 # This will bind to all interfaces
```
1. Define a `port` to force redis to listin on TCP so other machines can
connect to it:
```conf
# Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379 (IANA #815344).
# If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
port 6379
```
1. Set up password authentication (use the same password in all nodes)
```conf
masterauth "<password>"
requirepass "redis-password-goes-here"
masterauth "redis-password-goes-here"
```
1. Restart the Redis services for the changes to take effect.
---
**Slave Redis instance**
**Using Redis via Omnibus**
1. Follow same instructions from master with the extra change in `redis.conf`:
1. Edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb` of a master Redis machine (usualy a single machine):
```conf
# IP and port of the master Redis server
slaveof 10.10.10.10 6379
```
```ruby
## Redis TCP support (will disable UNIX socket transport)
redis['bind'] = '0.0.0.0' # or specify an IP to bind to a single one
redis['port'] = 6379
1. Restart the Redis services for the changes to take effect.
## Master redis instance
redis['password'] = 'redis-password-goes-here'
```
#### Omnibus Install
1. Edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb` of a slave Redis machine (should be one or more machines):
You need to install the omnibus package in 3 different and independent machines.
We will elect one as the initial `Master` and the other 2 as `Slaves`.
```ruby
## Redis TCP support (will disable UNIX socket transport)
redis['bind'] = '0.0.0.0' # or specify an IP to bind to a single one
redis['port'] = 6379
If you are migrating from a single machine install, you may want to setup the
machines as Slaves, pointing to the original machine as `Master`, to migrate
the data first, and than switch to this setup.
## Slave redis instance
redis['master'] = false
redis['master_ip'] = '10.10.10.10' # IP of master Redis server
redis['master_port'] = 6379 # Port of master Redis server
redis['master_password'] = "redis-password-goes-here"
```
To disable redis in the single install, edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`:
```ruby
redis['enable'] = false
```
**Master Redis instances**
You need to make the following changes in `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb`:
1. Define a `redis['bind']` address pointing to a local IP that your other machines
can reach you. If you really need to bind to an external acessible IP, make
sure you add extra firewall rules to prevent unauthorized access.
1. Define a `redis['port']` to force redis to listin on TCP so other machines can
connect to it.
1. Set up password authentication with `redis['master_password']` (use the same
password in all nodes).
1. Reconfigure the GitLab for the changes to take effect: `sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
```ruby
## Redis TCP support (will disable UNIX socket transport)
redis['bind'] = '0.0.0.0' # or specify an IP to bind to a single one
redis['port'] = 6379
redis['requirepass'] = 'redis-password-goes-here'
redis['master_password'] = 'redis-password-goes-here'
```
Reconfigure GitLab Omnibus for the changes to take effect: `sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
**Slave Redis instances**
You need to make the same changes listed for the `Master` instance,
with an additional `Slave` section as in the example below:
```ruby
## Redis TCP support (will disable UNIX socket transport)
redis['bind'] = '0.0.0.0' # or specify an IP to bind to a single one
redis['port'] = 6379
redis['requirepass'] = 'redis-password-goes-here'
redis['master_password'] = 'redis-password-goes-here'
## Slave redis instance
redis['master'] = false
redis['master_ip'] = '10.10.10.10' # IP of master Redis server
redis['master_port'] = 6379 # Port of master Redis server
```
Reconfigure GitLab Omnibus for the changes to take effect: `sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure`
#### Troubleshooting Replication
You can check if everything is correct by connecting to each server using
`redis-cli` application, and sending the `INFO` command.
If authentication was correctly defined, it should fail with:
`NOAUTH Authentication required` error. Try to authenticate with the
previous defined password with `AUTH redis-password-goes-here` and
try the `INFO` command again.
Look for the `# Replication` section where you should see some important
information like the `role` of the server.
When connected to a `master` redis, you will see the number of connected
`slaves`, and a list of each with connection details.
When it's a `slave`, you will see details of the master connection and if
its `up` or `down`.
---
Now that the Redis servers are all set up, let's configure the Sentinel
servers.
### Sentinel setup
If you are not sure if your Redis servers are working and replicating
correctly, please read the [Troubleshooting Replication](#troubleshooting-replication)
and fix it before proceeding with Sentinel setup.
### Sentinel
You must have at least `3` Redis Sentinel servers, and they need to
be each in a independent machine. You can install them in the same
machines you installed the other `3` Redis servers.
This number is required for the consensus algorithm to be effective
in the case of a failure. You should always have and `odd` number
of Sentinel nodes provisioned.
We provide an automated way to setup and run the Sentinel daemon
with GitLab EE.
Here is a simple explanation on how Sentinel handles a failover:
See the instructions below how to setup it by yourself.
When a number of Sentinels (`quorum` value) agree the fact the `master` is
not reachable, the **majority** of the sentinels must elect a temporary
Sentinel `leader`, that will be responsible to start the failover proceedings.
Here is an example configuration file (`sentinel.conf`) for a Sentinel node:
As an example, for a cluster of `3` Sentinels, at least `2` must agree on a
`leader`. If you have total of `5` at least `3` must agree on the leader.
The `quorum` is only used to detect failure, not to elect the `leader`.
Official [Sentinel documentation](http://redis.io/topics/sentinel#example-sentinel-deployments)
also lists different network topologies and warns againts situations like
network partition and how it can affect the state of the HA solution. Make
sure you read it carefully and understand the implications in your current
setup.
To make Sentinel setup easier, ee provide an [automated way to setup and run](#sentinel-setup-ee-only)
the Sentinel daemon with GitLab EE.
#### Sentinel setup (Community Edition)
For GitLab CE, you need to install, configure, execute and monitor Sentinel
by yourself.
Here is an example configuration file (`sentinel.conf`) for a minimal Sentinel
node:
```conf
port 26379
sentinel monitor gitlab-redis 10.0.0.1 6379 1
bind 0.0.0.0 # bind to all interfaces or change to a specific IP
port 26379 # default sentinel port
sentinel auth-pass gitlab-redis redis-password-goes-here
sentinel monitor gitlab-redis 10.0.0.1 6379 2
sentinel down-after-milliseconds gitlab-redis 10000
sentinel config-epoch gitlab-redis 0
sentinel leader-epoch gitlab-redis 0
```
#### Sentinel setup (EE Only)
To setup sentinel, you must edit `/etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb` file.
This is a minimal configuration required to run the daemon:
```ruby
redis['master_name'] = 'gitlab-redis' # must be the same in every sentinel node
redis['master_ip'] = '10.0.0.1' # ip of the initial master redis instance
redis['master_port'] = 6379 # port of the initial master redis instance
redis['master_password'] = 'your-secure-password-here' # the same value defined in redis['password'] in the master instance
sentinel['enable'] = true
# sentinel['port'] = 26379
## Quorum must reflect the amount of voting sentinels it take to start a failover.
sentinel['quorum'] = 2
## Consider unresponsive server down after x amount of ms.
# sentinel['down_after_milliseconds'] = 10000
# sentinel['failover_timeout'] = 60000
```
When you install Sentinel in a separate machine, you need to control which
other services will be running in it. Take a look at the following variables
and enable or disable whenever it fits your strategy:
```ruby
# Enabled Redis and Sentinel services
redis['enable'] = true
sentinel['enable'] = true
# Disabled all other services
redis['enable'] = false
bootstrap['enable'] = false
nginx['enable'] = false
unicorn['enable'] = false
sidekiq['enable'] = false
postgresql['enable'] = false
gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
gitlab_rails['enable'] = false
mailroom['enable'] = false
```
Remember that enabling a new service may also require additional configuration
params (like `redis` for example).
---
The final part is to inform the main GitLab application server of the Redis
......@@ -243,7 +439,7 @@ or `gitlab-rails['redis_*']` in Omnibus):
```conf
# sentinel.conf:
sentinel monitor gitlab-redis 10.10.10.10 6379 1
sentinel monitor gitlab-redis 10.10.10.10 6379 2
sentinel down-after-milliseconds gitlab-redis 10000
sentinel config-epoch gitlab-redis 0
sentinel leader-epoch gitlab-redis 0
......@@ -276,7 +472,7 @@ To make sure your configuration is correct:
sudo gitlab-rails console
# For source installations
sudo -u git rails console RAILS_ENV=production
sudo -u git rails console production
```
1. Run in the console:
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment