1. 31 Oct, 2020 1 commit
  2. 29 Oct, 2020 1 commit
  3. 10 Sep, 2020 1 commit
  4. 08 Aug, 2020 1 commit
  5. 30 Jul, 2020 1 commit
    • Matt Harbison's avatar
      bump to evolve 10.0.0+ · 082414bdd060
      Matt Harbison authored
      The tag isn't applied yet, but something with phases is no longer hashable, so
      an update is needed.
      082414bdd060
  6. 08 Jul, 2020 2 commits
  7. 20 May, 2020 1 commit
  8. 10 Apr, 2020 1 commit
  9. 08 Mar, 2020 1 commit
  10. 05 Mar, 2020 1 commit
  11. 15 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  12. 12 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  13. 06 Feb, 2020 2 commits
    • Matt Harbison's avatar
      bump extensions · 36f5400c7e44
      Matt Harbison authored
      I have no idea where dulwich went- this seems autogenerated.  I had to install
      it into the virtualenv at one point, but that's easy enough to do.
      36f5400c7e44
    • Matt Harbison's avatar
      update low level API exclusion list · fa593fc8d406
      Matt Harbison authored
      I have no idea why my Windows 10 (1909) system wants to include what looks like
      older API DLLs.  I tried, but failed to figure out how to hack the build process
      to exclude these by prefix.
      fa593fc8d406
  14. 30 Jan, 2020 1 commit
  15. 19 Aug, 2019 1 commit
  16. 02 Aug, 2019 1 commit
  17. 14 Jul, 2019 2 commits
    • Matt Harbison's avatar
      run the equivalent of vcvarsall.bat when using 'Visual C++ for Python 2.7' · 6bee37c75532
      Matt Harbison authored
      This means that any command prompt will properly build everything, whereas
      before the 'Visual C++ 2008 64-bit Cross Tools Command Prompt' was required.
      The goal is to remove a point of failure (the plain 64-bit prompt fails), and to
      move towards automated builds like core Mercurial.  I've only got the Express
      edition at home (which fails to build this), so I'm not doing the same for
      Visual Studio 2008.
      6bee37c75532
    • Matt Harbison's avatar
      add support for building with 'Microsoft Visual C++ Compiler for Python 2.7' · 17b24295a60e
      Matt Harbison authored
      The build process already builds Mercurial with this compiler if it is
      installed, so we might as well use this to compile the shell extension if it is
      available.  The only manual change needed is to download these merge modules:
      
          vc9-crt-x64-msm
          vc9-crt-x64-msm-policy
      
      create 'Redist\VC' here:
      
          %LOCALAPPDATA%\Programs\Common\Microsoft\Visual C++ for Python\9.0\WinSDK\
      
      and name them:
      
          Microsoft.VCxx.CRT.x64_msm.msm
          policy.x.xx.Microsoft.VCxx.CRT.x64_msm.msm
      
      I have no idea why, but DISTUTILS_USE_SDK can't be set, otherwise Mercurial
      fails to build its C extensions.  The strange thing is that the new packaging
      scripts *do* set this.
      
      [1] https://github.com/indygreg/vc90-merge-modules
      17b24295a60e
  18. 13 Jul, 2019 2 commits
  19. 23 Jul, 2019 1 commit
  20. 14 Apr, 2019 3 commits
  21. 24 Feb, 2019 2 commits
  22. 19 Jan, 2019 1 commit
  23. 10 Dec, 2018 5 commits
  24. 29 Oct, 2018 1 commit
  25. 14 Nov, 2018 4 commits
  26. 20 Oct, 2018 1 commit
    • Paul Morelle's avatar
      setup: allow specification of certificate password on command line · fb6ef98c6f8d
      Paul Morelle authored
      In the case of an automated build, it may be interesting to avoid being
      asked the password on the standard input for each build.
      The new option --certpwd allows for the specification of this password
      on the command line.
      
      CI tools usually have a mechanism to use a secret value in a variable,
      whose value will be hidden from the console output.
      fb6ef98c6f8d